Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness Masterclass With Tim Duerden | Movies and Videos | Training

Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness Masterclass With Tim Duerden

Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness Masterclass With Tim Duerden PLDZ-48
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Research suggests that most people learning mindfulness do not experience any major negative effects and, on this basis, those who have not received a thorough training can have an ill-informed attitude that mindfulness practice is intrinsically benign and that anyone could teach what seems so simple: 'Just follow your breath with awareness...'. 

But how concerned should we be about the minority who are not 'most people'? It is only recently that this has begun to be researched: Willoughby Britton, David Treleaven, and Leigh Burrows have found that a significant number of people have trauma-associated reactions to certain mindfulness practices and many more silently struggle with aversive reactions to certain practices. Their findings suggest that, of those that do experience negative reactions to particular mindfulness practices, many do not feel able to report their experience to their mindfulness teacher. Of particular concern are people who experience traumatic reactions while practising mindfulness: either re-triggering of old trauma or experiencing new trauma in the context of mindfulness teaching. The limited research suggests body focused and breath-focused practices are more likely to provoke trauma reactions - especially when the person is in a quiet environment with eyes closed and body still. 

While embodied mindful awareness is central to trauma recovery, what is emerging is an understanding of how crucial it is to ensure that the mindfulness practices chosen to cultivate mindful awareness are appropriate to the person practising them.

This webinar will be an opportunity to discuss these issues, consider how we can teach mindfulness practices with confidence in their safety through a person-centred approach, and explore a reflective framework that can help match individual needs to the mindfulness practices we teach. 

Research suggests that most people learning mindfulness do not experience any major negative effects and, on this basis, those who have not received a thorough training can have an ill-informed attitude that mindfulness practice is intrinsically beni
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