Alia - Chapter 04 | eBooks | Non-Fiction

Alia - Chapter 04

Alia - Chapter 04 AliaNew_04 Instant Download Price
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Buy and Download Description Earlier, I called The New Media Nation an "outlaw" nation. According to Webster's Online Dictionary (2008), the English noun, outlaw, dates back to before the twelfth century, evolving from the Old Norse ütlagi, from üt (out) + lag- or loüg (law), to the Old English ütlaga, Middle English outlawe. The current meanings are: "a person excluded from the benefit or protection of the law"; "a lawless person or a fugitive from the law"; "a person or organization under a ban or restriction"; "one that is unconventional or rebellious"; and "an animal (as a horse) that is wild and unmanageable." The Compact Oxford English Dictionary Online (2008) places the two main definitions in reverse order. Here, the first definition is "A fugitive from the law," and the second, "A person deprived of the benefit and protection of the law." I would contend that all of these definitions, including the one about "unmanageable" animals, can be applied to the spirit and substance of the New Media Nation, with the "unmanageable" label falling into the (racist) "wild Indian" genre of outsider misrepresentation. Most of the Indigenous media practitioners and consumers I have interviewed, over the years, view the "Nation's" outlaws as Robin Hood figures, operating in the people's interests. If not literally "stealing from the rich," they most certainly are "giving to the poor" — to those disadvantaged by governments, corporations, and more generally, by economic and environmental circumstances. Earlier, I called The New Media Nation an "outlaw" nation. According to Webster's Online Dictionary (2008), the English noun, outlaw, dates back to before the twelfth century, evolving from the Old Norse ütlagi, from üt (out) + lag- or l
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