Maida - Chapter 11 | eBooks | Non-Fiction

Maida - Chapter 11

Maida - Chapter 11 MaidaSustainability_11 Instant Download Price
In Stock
$ 9.00 USD
bbks@berghahnbooksonline.com
Buy and Download Description

In an important intervention in the literature on environmental political economy, John Dryzek (1996) explains how debate over the possibility of constructing an ecosustainable future for human society has largely swirled around two perspectives on human nature. On the one side is Homo economicus, the instrumental, "rational" actor of neoclassical economics. And, on the other side, there is Homo ecologicus, the new, ascetic ecological subject of "Green" social theory. For Dryzek, it is abundantly clear that little space exists in instrumental rationality for the ecosensitivity required by a future environmentally responsible social order. On the other hand, he is concerned with the possible authoritarian political outcome of inculcating the new ecological subjectivity and the extent of the social regression entailed in certain Green visions of self-sufficient microcommunities. What troubles him to an even greater extent is the very endeavor of both sides to reduce the issue of environmental political economy to "psychology" in the first place. As Dryzek (1996: 30) posits, the need for social science derives precisely from the fact "that society, and social structure, are not reducible to psychology." Thus he proposes a twofold solution for thinking anew about the political economy of environmental sustainability. First, Dryzek (1996: 38) argues for "an ecological political economy [that] would concern itself with the structure, organization and operation of political-economic systems as they confront ecological problems." Second, Dryzek (1996: 28) argues for "human intersubjectivity and communication" as the nexus through which the processes of institution-building for the future eco-sustainable order are to be articulated. However, while I am in agreement with the above characterization of social science and the task of political economy, and accept that social "communication" broadly conceived has an important role to play in remaking our social communities, Dryzek's article never considers a set of deeper, more pressing questions that spring from his insights.

In an important intervention in the literature on environmental political economy, John Dryzek (1996) explains how debate over the possibility of constructing an ecosustainable future for human society has largely swirled around two perspectives o
Recent Reviews Be the first to Review this product!
0 0 0 0 reviews