Anderson and Nuttall - Chapter 12 | eBooks | Non-Fiction

Anderson and Nuttall - Chapter 12

Anderson and Nuttall - Chapter 12 AndersonCultivating_12 Instant Download Price
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Buy and Download Description The contributors to this volume have discussed the relationship of circumpolar peoples to the wild animals which support them, and the politics of regulation of Arctic landscapes, hunting and herding in a range of local cultural contexts. Although the ethnographic material ranges across a vast part of the northern reaches of the globe, the contributors point to the compelling similarities in the political and cultural settings of aboriginal peoples, together with their common experiences about how various capitalist and socialist states claimed control over their lands and animals. The majority of contributors describe how animals such as caribou and reindeer are the cultural, economic and often spiritual foundation for many northern peoples, including the Gwich'in of Alaska and northwestern Canada, the Saami of Fennoscandia and Russia's Kola Peninsula, and numerous peoples of Siberia and the Russian Far East, such as the Evenki and Chukchi. Inuit groups in Alaska, Canada and Greenland, while mainly hunters of marine mammals, often see caribou meat as an important subsistence food or an important source of income. Arctic peoples identify closely with the caribou they hunt and the reindeer they herd. They are dependent on them for much of their food, and they use their hides for clothing, for tents and other shelters. Yet these animals not only sustain indigenous peoples in an economic sense; they provide a fundamental basis for social identity, cultural survival and spiritual life, which is illustrated by rich mythologies, vivid oral histories, festivals and ceremonies. The contributors to this volume have discussed the relationship of circumpolar peoples to the wild animals which support them, and the politics of regulation of Arctic landscapes, hunting and herding in a range of local cultural contexts. Although
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