Abelshauser - Chapter 01 | eBooks | Non-Fiction

Abelshauser - Chapter 01

Abelshauser - Chapter 01 AbelshauserDynamics_01 Instant Download Price
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Buy and Download Description 1. Beyond "The End of History"
When the East Bloc imploded in the early 1990s, the American philosopher Francis Fukuyama spoke of the "end of history."1 He meant, in Hegel's sense, the suspension of the great antagonism between the economic systems in East and West�between the First and Second Worlds�and, hence, the end of the idea of a dialectically mediated, progress-oriented synthesis of economic development bound to pull the Third World along gradually, too. The varieties of "Western" production regimes, for all their dissimilarities upon close inspection of their traditional institutional frameworks, counted little. As long as the East-West conflict also dominated the ideological struggle for worldwide political and economic hegemony, such differences were regarded only as facets of the same thing, the "free world's" market-based economic system. This monolithic perspective, a symptom of thinking in terms of blocs, quickly eclipsed the fact that World War II had also been fought as fratricide between differing branches of capitalism's extended family and that eliminating "corporatist" peculiarities of the German economic system had been a leading American war aim. It was the United States that therefore explicitly insisted after 1945 on trying German industrialists, whose heresy against the liberal creed of capitalism was partially blamed for the rise and crimes of the Nazi regime. Even before the end of the Nuremberg trials of industrialists, however, the wind of world politics changed and blew bloc-related internal disputes about the pure theory of capitalism into the background. The Cold War had begun, creating new, clearer-cut fronts in the competition for hegemony on the world's markets. All that mattered thereafter were economic efficiency and the ability to improve the economic stability and military defense of one's own camp as much as possible. Not until this East-West antagonism between the economic systems entered its final phase did it lose its capacity to mask internal divergence. 1. Beyond "The End of History" When the East Bloc imploded in the early 1990s, the American philosopher Francis Fukuyama spoke of the "end of history."1 He meant, in Hegel's sense, the suspension of the great antagonism between the economi
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