Reinhardt - Chapter 03 | eBooks | Non-Fiction

Reinhardt - Chapter 03

Reinhardt - Chapter 03 ReinhardtClaims_03 Instant Download Price
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Buy and Download Description "We the Negroes ... are ready to die for this freedom, for we want to and will obtain it at any price, even with the help of mortars, canons, and rifles" (ANF Colonies F3 29, 1789b). Martinican slaves declared their right to freedom in writing for the first time in August 1789, in a series of letters addressed to colonial administrators. Seeing that their demands went unheeded, they broke out into an insurrection several days later. The relationship between this historic episode and the narratives by the Société des Amis des Noirs and colonial planters that preceded and followed it provides unprecedented insight into how the memory of slavery was formed. A test of the Revolution's universalist claims, the colonial question reached its boiling point between 1789 and 1794 (Geggus 1989a: 1291). It is during this period that conflicting interests between slaves, free coloreds, white colonial planters, and French abolitionists clashed together, producing irreversible changes in the French colonies. A number of historians of French slavery deplore the absence of the colonial question in revolutionary historiography.1 More importantly, the slaves' voices were covered up by more dominant narratives and have thus been lost as a testimony of their rightful share in these historical events. "We the Negroes ... are ready to die for this freedom, for we want to and will obtain it at any price, even with the help of mortars, canons, and rifles" (ANF Colonies F3 29, 1789b). Martinican slaves declared their right to freedom in writing for
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