NicosiaBusiness - Chapter 04 | eBooks | Non-Fiction

NicosiaBusiness - Chapter 04

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Buy and Download Description Most slave labor in Nazi Germany took place under the aegis of German corporations. Concentration camp prisoners represented only a small minority of compulsory laborers in Germany's wartime workforce, that is, "only" about 700,000 at the height of wartime production. In comparison, millions of prisoners of war and slave laborers conscripted in the East made up over 25 percent of the German workforce by 1945. The SS served as a labor lord, to be sure, but it was, to mix metaphors, the handmaiden of slavery in the German war economy, not its initiator. It has been widely assumed that the SS sought to use its captive pool of slave labor in order to increase its influence over German corporations and, indeed, to "control the German economy." But, in fact, well-known German companies such as Volkswagen or IG Farben came to the SS looking for labor. Business partnerships between them and the SS solidified only at the very end of the Third Reich. The first tentative projects, involving no more than a few thousand prisoners, did not begin until 1941, when labor was desperately scarce. A network of slave labor in SS "satellites" of the major concentration camps did not really begin to spread throughout Germany until late 1943 and early 1944. After this point, scarcely any German factory of importance had not applied for concentration camp prisoners. Most slave labor in Nazi Germany took place under the aegis of German corporations. Concentration camp prisoners represented only a small minority of compulsory laborers in Germany's wartime workforce, that is, "only" about 700,000 at the height o
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