Indra - Chapter 12 | eBooks | Non-Fiction

Indra - Chapter 12

Indra - Chapter 12 IndraEngendering_12 Instant Download Price
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Why is it that in Chile we know more about the United States than this country knows about us? -Alicia, high school student 1 It is a shame-since our North American cousins have unspeakable interests in this regard-that we continue to live in Latin America without knowing each other. -Paulo Freire (1994)
Language is the main signifier of the historical self. We constantly name our autobiographical search that witnesses what is inscribed, remembered, or appears to make sense: the 'here' and 'there' in the space configuration of our positionality. Our utterances trace the ambiguities of a past. To remember anything nostalgically is to do so through the lens of one's present, at the same time projecting it as a sign into the future. The dilemma of exilic memories is that language is caught between the language that names what is already known and the language of 'difference', which tries to articulate experiences. In this way, the past often becomes woven in a poetic reencoding of metaphorical and metonymic logic of multiple representations, which acts "at the very edge of semantic availability" (Williams, cited in Rutherford 1990: 22). Likewise, the diasporic and displacement process of 'interpreting' and 'reading' identities is far from immune from the forces of conflict and tension in the dialectical operations that bring women's experiences to the frontline of displacement as a subject's history, to where "language is the site of history's enactment" (Scott 1992: 34). Why is it that in Chile we know more about the United States than this country knows about us? -Alicia, high school student 1 It is a shame-since our North American cousins have unspeakable interests in this regard-that we continue to live in Lati
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