Frechette - Chapter 02 | eBooks | Non-Fiction

Frechette - Chapter 02

Frechette - Chapter 02 FrechetteTibetans_02 Instant Download Price
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Buy and Download Description U.S. intergovernmental organizations first became involved with the soon-to-be Tibetan exiles in July 1950.1 U.S. soldiers were fighting in Korea whenChina's People's Liberation Army (PLA) attacked Tibet's eastern border town of Dengo and threatened to take the Tibetan government outpost at Chamdo. With only five hundred poorly trained and ill-equipped Tibetan soldiers in eastern Tibet (Knaus 1999: 71), with eighty thousand PLA soldiers waiting to fight them (Dalai Lama of Tibet 1990: 52), and with questionable support for the Tibetan government among the local population, the Tibetan government did not know, at first, how to respond.2 China's new communist government was intent to incorporate Tibet into its territory. The Tibetans had no way in which to resist. Indian independence had removed British interests from the region, and all efforts on the part of the Tibetan government to secure an alternative source of support had failed.3 The Dalai Lama fled from his capital at Lhasa to Yatung, on the border between Tibet and India, while his government appealed simultaneously to Beijing to withdraw its soldiers and to Britain, India, and the U.S. to help. Both Britain and India refused on the basis that Tibet's liberation was inevitable (Goldstein 1989: 661-791). The U.S., however, responded. U.S. State Department officials perceived the war in Korea and the Chinese attack on Tibet to be related. They perceived both to be part of the same international communist conspiracy determined to destroy the democracy of the West (Knaus 1999: 75). The U.S. government began its efforts to support Tibetan resistance against the Chinese. Its efforts include assistance to Tibetans in Tibet, Tibetan exiles in India, and the Tibetan exiles in Nepal. Its support has continued, in various forms, for more than fifty years. U.S. intergovernmental organizations first became involved with the soon-to-be Tibetan exiles in July 1950.1 U.S. soldiers were fighting in Korea whenChina's People's Liberation Army (PLA) attacked Tibet's eastern border town of Dengo and threaten
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