Borneman - Chapter 06 | eBooks | Non-Fiction

Borneman - Chapter 06

Borneman - Chapter 06 BornemanDeath_06 Instant Download Price
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Buy and Download Description The Soviet experience is replete with authoritarian bodysnatching. Either the body must be rendered eternal, like Lenin's waxy remains lying forever in state on Red Square, or the body must be spirited away, like Stalin's corpse taken to commune with the Kremlin wall after a short joint residence in Lenin's tomb. Actually, a sly combination of posterity and oblivion is the ideal: simultaneous extermination and resuscitation. Eliminating the god-king while seeking to retain the symbolic structure of his authority. Political patricide and visitation of the shrine to the dead father. That Stalin has been difficult to kill off is a well-known fact of Soviet life. The year of Stalin's death, 1953, was neither the end nor the beginning of adulatory ambivalence about his mortality. During the Gorbachev glasnost era, a film was made in Stalin's homeland of Georgia, called Penitence (Abuladze 1986). In it, the unfortunate children of a perished father—a man whose identity is unmistakably Stalin writ small—are plagued with his reappearing corpse. Since the end of glasnost, Stalin has reappeared ever more frequently on the exalting lips of former-Soviet citizens wishing to resuscitate him. Khrushchev meant to do away with him already in 1956 with his "secret speech" to the Twentieth Party Congress. But a few years later, Stalin revived to silence Khrushchev instead, and many hoped the unpredictable if benign Khrushchev would be succeeded by someone more similar to Stalin. The Soviet experience is replete with authoritarian bodysnatching. Either the body must be rendered eternal, like Lenin's waxy remains lying forever in state on Red Square, or the body must be spirited away, like Stalin's corpse taken to commune w
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