Black - Chapter 13 | eBooks | Non-Fiction

Black - Chapter 13

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Buy and Download Description In the study of repatriation, the lion's share of attention has been placed on examining either the decision to repatriate (particularly identifying the factors that go into electing to return and determining whether such decisions are voluntary), or the actual repatriation movement from the country of exile to the country of origin. While such areas of enquiry are obviously valid, there has been a virtual neglect of the later stages of repatriation, in which returnees attempt to establish themselves socially, economically and politically in their areas of return. Failing critically to consider these later stages can lead to the erroneous conclusion that with physical repatriation comes the end of the migration or displacement cycle. In fact the end of the process may still be years away for some returnee populations. As scholars and practitioners attempting to understand this process from the point of view of the repatriates, we need to question our assumptions about the meanings we give to concepts of 'return', 'home' and 'place' while at the same time reassessing the terms we use to describe postrepatriation life. In this chapter I argue that our understanding of the sociocultural and economic processes in which returnees become involved following repatriation is handicapped by our use of biased and inappropriate terminology. Lacking precise conceptual tools for examining what returnees do once they get down from the trucks that brought them back to their country of origin, aid providers are largely shooting in the dark when they try to develop assistance packages or to evaluate repatriation operations. Social scientists, who use misleading terminology borrowed largely from the international aid regime, its subdiscipline disaster management, and outdated migration theories, also fail to appreciate the lessons that returnees can teach them about culture change, the construction of communities, and the multiple meanings of, and connections between, notions of identity, culture, home and geographical place. In the study of repatriation, the lion's share of attention has been placed on examining either the decision to repatriate (particularly identifying the factors that go into electing to return and determining whether such decisions are voluntary),
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