Black - Chapter 10 | eBooks | Non-Fiction

Black - Chapter 10

Black - Chapter 10 BlackEnd_10 Instant Download Price
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Buy and Download Description When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, Russia and the other newly independent states had no legislative or institutional framework for monitoring or managing large migrational flows, still less 'forced' migrations and refugee streams. During the Soviet period 'immigration' into the USSR had been virtually nonexistent and migration between constituent members of the Union ('interrepublican migration') was treated largely as an issue of rational economic planning.1 In the post-Soviet period, however, Russia has found it necessary to develop rapidly legislative and executive structures to manage a range of population movements. More than one hundred migrational flows have been identified in the post-Soviet space, ranging from the organised and planned withdrawal of Russian military personnel from Eastern Europe and some of the Newly Independent States to the flight from ethnic and military conflict in many former republics (Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Moldova, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia) and within the Russian Federation itself (North Osetia, Chechnia). UNHCR estimates that there are currently nine million displaced people on the territory of the former Soviet Union. When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, Russia and the other newly independent states had no legislative or institutional framework for monitoring or managing large migrational flows, still less 'forced' migrations and refugee streams. During the
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