Black - Chapter 01 | eBooks | Non-Fiction

Black - Chapter 01

Black - Chapter 01 BlackEnd_01 Instant Download Price
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Buy and Download Description At the beginning of the 1990s there was great optimism that the end of the Cold War might also result in the end of the global 'refugee cycle'. Cold War analyses of refugee displacements often highlighted the 'escape' from communism as the principal motive for refugee movements in the North. They tended to explain refugee-generating conflicts in the South in terms of wars conducted by proxy by the two superpowers (Suhrke and Zolberg 1989). In reality, though, the global refugee population increased substantially immediately after the end of the Cold War, from about 14.9 million in 1990 to 17.2 million in 1991 (UNHCR 1995a). The collapse of the former Soviet Union was a particularly significant event, which led to a wave of ethnic conflicts in the former Republics. As many as two million refugees have fled conflicts in Nagorno-Karabakh, Georgia, Moldova, Tajikistan and in the Russian Caucasus (Codagnone 1997). In the South, it became clear that many of the conflicts which perhaps started as proxy wars had taken on their own momentum, and refugees continued to flee Angola and Afghanistan, for example. In addition, new conflicts have emerged in the new geopolitical environment (Sword 1992). Up to two million people were displaced by the war in the former Yugoslavia, and perhaps one million from Liberia. New battle lines have been drawn between local protagonists and a range of international sponsors. At the beginning of the 1990s there was great optimism that the end of the Cold War might also result in the end of the global 'refugee cycle'. Cold War analyses of refugee displacements often highlighted the 'escape' from communism as the princip
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